New Small Pipe Bag

I am making some progress with my small pipe bags. The success is down to finding some light weight material which is airtight; believe me it has taken me ages to find such material. I have been working also with a rubber solution to make the seams airtight yet flexible after gluing and sewing.

I made a bag with a “round” design, these bags are quite popular for small pipes and for gaita, the idea is that there is no bag protruding out from underneath the back of your armpit, so you can sit comfortable on a chair for example. But when I added the stocks for a bellow, I found it very uncomfortable to hold, I feel the “long bag” is ideal for bellows use.

Today I converted the bag into a mouth blown system by using some connecting stocks so I could fit a mouth piece. The original drone stock became the mouth piece stock; and the original blow pipe stock became the drone stock.

The design worked quite well, and I think I will keep it in the future and the new stocks line-up the mouth piece with the mouth very comfortably, without the need for cord to keep it in place.

I made a new stock for the bag to fit the Galician chanter in D, and played it without a drone. It worked very well; it uses little pressure and a good feel to it underneath my arm. I closed the chanter reed to make it play 2 notes above the octave (d’-e’- f#’). This is for the new tune book I recently bought by Matt Seattle, it is the repertoire of the 18th century piper Geordie Sims. These melodies have a lot of high notes, and it is common that e’ and f#’ will be used.

The next thing to do is to make the drones. I am thinking to make a drone stock so I can add 3 small pipe drones to the bag. So the Galician chanter will have a small pipe drone configuration D-d- d’. I hope to post some photos when I am finished.

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Xeremies’s “Ancient” Scale

We went to visit Juan Morley, in the town of San Joan. He is a researcher, musician and maker of the Mallorcan bagpipe “The Xeremies”.

He told us about the old scale used by the Xeremier players in the 60s. He said they used a different scale than today. A scale that is not based on harmony, or harmonizing with the drone, or perfect 5ths.

he explained: “you tune your drone (C) to your root note on the chanter (C) making sure the top octave (C’) is also in tune with the drone. Top and bottom of the chanter is in tune with the drone.

The 4th note (F) and 5th note (G) are also in tune with the drone using the harmonic series. So far it is normal to other modern bagpipes.

Here is where the differences occur. The tuning of the rest of the scale is different. It does not use semitones (or half tones) but quarter tones (1/4)…approximately!

Normally the 2nd would be a D (440cents), but with this old Xeremeis scale it is flat of of D, of about a 1/4 tone. Normally the 2nd note clashes with the drone anyways but this would make it more so.

the 3rd note should be an E at 440cents, and therefore harmonizing as a 3rd in the harmonic series… it would be a nice harmony, either using a major 3rd (an E) or a minor 3rd (Eb), but this old scale uses neither, it plays a 1/4 note flat of E.

the 6th note is a A (440cents) but again this is not concert pitch, it is a 1/4 note flat of A, again not harmonizing with other instruments, not with the drone.

the 7th note is flat also roughly a 1/4 tone, not a semitone.

Here, Juan Morley plays the “ancient” scale on the Xeremier.

I have only seen one other example of this tuning in Spain and this was with the Sanabresa Gaita, which also uses 1/4 notes in its scale.